Inside-the-new-standards-for-kids-and-screen-time/

January 1, 2017

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The American Academy of Pediatrics is adjusting its less-is-more approach to screen time for kids. When it comes to screen time for kids, less is more. That’s what the American Academy of Pediatrics has maintained for years, warning that exposing young children to any kind of digital platform, from junk TV to educational apps, could lead to delayed or stunted language development and poorer reading skills. Whether or not people agreed with the AAP guidelines—and many did not—they were nonetheless impactful, driving pediatricians to advise the parents and kids in their care to stay away from screens. Now, however, the AAP is changing its tune. Whereas the old guidelines offered blanket limits—say, no screen time of any kind before age 2—the new ones, released Oct. 21, are far more nuanced. “You’ll notice a move away from the idea that you can lump all screen time together and label it fun or educational or harmful,” says Dr. David Hill, chair of the group’s Council on Communications and Media. “The ways we interact with screens today are so varied that it doesn’t make sense anymore to start a stopwatch and say, ‘At this point you’re done.’ ” At the same time, kids’ having access to so many screens is a relatively new phenomenon, and much of the research surrounding it is in-conclusive. That makes it hard for the AAP to say definitively, for example, that playing smartphone games is badand using educational tablets is good.

What its new guidelines make clear,though, is that there are many ways—beyond strict limits—to help your kids have a happy, healthy relationship with technology. Read More

Source:  Time Magazine, October 27, 2016